Posted by: Rael Kalley | May 1, 2010

39. I just can’t imagine

Imagine this, from a very early age you began the practice of lifting weights.

And imagine that you only used one type of weight for this purpose – a dumbbell.

And imagine that you only used it to execute one type of exercise – a bicep curl.

And imagine how, when you began this practice it felt a little strange and you had to keep reminding yourself to do it.

And imagine how much easier it became to do this after a short time.

And imagine that soon you no longer had to remind yourself to do this.

And imagine that this became an unconscious, automatic part of your daily routine.

And imagine that your constant devotion to practicing this skill made you into an expert.

And imagine that as you got older you exercised more frequently.

And imagine that as you got stronger you kept increasing the weight.

And imagine that you continue this regimen to this very day.

And imagine that all this time you only exercised your left arm.

And imagine how incredibly well developed and strong that arm has become.

And imagine how silly that would be.

And imagine how ridiculous you would look.

And imagine how puny and unused your right arm would appear to be.

And imagine that your brain is a muscle.

And imagine that, instead of exercising your left arm every day, you spent those years exercising your brain.

And imagine that the method of exercise you chose was a daily barrage of self criticism.

And imagine that you kept telling yourself that you weren’t good enough.

And imagine that you kept telling yourself that you weren’t worthy.

And imagine that you kept telling yourself that you would never succeed at anything.

And imagine that you kept telling yourself many similar things.

And imagine that when you began doing this you didn’t really want to believe what you were saying.

And imagine that you persevered and kept practicing until all doubt was removed.

And imagine that you still do this.

And imagine that you have become so proficient at this that it no longer requires practice, it is an automatic function.

And imagine how well developed that part of your brain has become.

And imagine  that this is now what you believe.

And imagine that you are willing to wrap your head around the notion that a belief is simply the meaning we have chosen to place on data.

And imagine what would happen if you began developing another part of your brain.

And imagine if you started saying nice things about yourself.

And imagine if you had to keep reminding yourself to do this.

And imagine if you did this even when you didn’t feel like doing it.

And imagine if you did this even if it felt silly.

And imagine if, over time you catch yourself doing this automatically.

And imagine if, the more you do this, the better you begin to feel about yourself.

And imagine if the better you feel about yourself, the better your life becomes.

And imagine if the better your life becomes, the happier you become.

And imagine if the happier you become, the more successful you become.

And imagine if the more successful you become, the less time you spend doing the first type of exercise.

And imagine if the other part of your brain becomes so well developed it can’t stop feeding you good stuff about yourself and your capabilities 

And imagine if you began to love yourself.

And imagine if you developed unlimited confidence in yourself.

And imagine if your life became everything you have always dreamed of.

And imagine if you made all this happen just because you can.

Ahh, what’s the point? It’s all in your head.

And imagine if you could buy my book for $24.95.

Till we read again.

P.S. My previous requests to motivate you to forward my blog to your friends and encourage them to subscribe and help me reach my goal of 5,000 subscribers have not generated much response.

That’s it. No more Mr. Nice Guy. If you don’t commit yourselves to helping me I will write a new blog EVERY DAY.

I mean it.

Govern yourselves accordingly.


Responses

  1. Thank you for this. It definetly gives me something to think about. Although I have enjoyed reading ALL of your blogs I think this one is your best. All my best to you and your family.

    Till we meet again,

    JG

  2. I see these themes in action every term, Rael, when I encounter students who say that they can’t write.

    I tell them to stop comparing themselves to poets and start imagining themselves as readers — or even as observers of themselves as they write.

    In fact, if I were feeling cavalier, I’d tell the students that even if they are poor writers, there is something productive at which they can excel.

    However, I don’t often feel cavalier enough to reduce the importance of writing any further than it already has been. 😉


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